Economics of Happiness

Helena Norberg-Hodge

Helena is a local film maker and activist best known for her remarkable documentary ‘The Economics of Happiness’.

The Economics of Happiness is a 2011 documentary film directed by Helena Norberg-Hodge, Steven Gorelick, and John Page, and produced by Local Futures (formerly the International Society for Ecology and Culture).SynopsisThe film features many voices from six continents calling for systemic economic change.

The documentary describes a world moving simultaneously in two opposing directions. While government and big business continue to promote globalization and the consolidation of corporate power, people around the world are resisting those policies and working to forge a very different future.

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Communities are coming together to re-build more human scale, ecological economies based on a new paradigm: an economics of localization.Recognition

The Economics of Happiness has won “Best in Show” at the Cinema Verde Film and Arts Festival, “Best Direction” from EKOFilm 2011, “Judges’ Choice” and “Audience Choice” at the Auroville International Film Festival, an “Award of Merit” from the Accolade Film Festival, and several other awards.

In 2012, the film was listed among the top ten films as chosen by Transition town initiatives.In 2015, it was awarded 1st place out of 100 “documentaries we can use to change the world” by Films for Action, an activism-oriented film screening and compilation site.

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To celebrate #InternationalDayOfForests we're sharing one of our favourite films from our #PlanetLocal short film series.

This inspiring 3-min film explains why diverse forest gardens may be critical to our survival in the years to come.

View this film as part of our week 7 release of #PlanetLocal Short Films - bit.ly/2ETPwwB

bit.ly/2UzCmLVInstead of neat rows of monoculture, forest gardens combine fruit and nut trees, shrubs, herbs, vines and perennial vegetables together in one seemingly wild...
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2 days ago

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Dom Blake - forest garden inspiration.

Wendell Berry speaks to our soul!

Last year, we recorded a conversation between Wendell and Helena Norberg-Hodge, the founder of Local Futures, for our Local Bites Podcast. Their far-reaching discussion touches on human nature, technology, experiential knowledge, agriculture policy, happiness, wildness, and local food systems.

You can listen to the full episode here: bit.ly/2tuK9hW
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3 days ago

Wendell Berry speaks to our soul! 

Last year, we recorded a conversation between Wendell and Helena Norberg-Hodge, the founder of Local Futures, for our Local Bites Podcast. Their far-reaching discussion touches on human nature, technology, experiential knowledge, agriculture policy, happiness, wildness, and local food systems.

You can listen to the full episode here: http://bit.ly/2tuK9hW

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My despair is the loss of wild places...

On #GlobalRecyclingDay, we're calling for system change.

"Recycling, in the true sense of the word, occurs in the ecologies around us. When a leaf falls from a tree, it becomes food for a host of microorganisms and insects, which then benefit others. The leaf is broken down into the very building blocks that another tree will use to grow again and sprout new leaves. In other words, 100% of its nutrients are being sublimely cycled into the infinite circles of life. This all happens with seamless efficiency, within a few meters of the tree.

When a plastic bottle is tossed into a ‘recycling’ bin, it begins a process of a fundamentally different sort. First, there is nothing local or sublime about industrial recycling. While in the system, the bottle is swept along a noisy, energy-intense journey around the planet. Much of North America’s plastic ends up being shipped to Asia for processing. Much Asian plastic gets sent to the rest of the world for consumption. The journey of a humble bottle spins a web around the planet involving countless miles of transportation; endless cargo trains, colossal container ships, and fleets of trucks hurtling down our highways. The plastic streams from one node in the grey network to another– from a raucous recycling centre, to a refinery, to a fuming factory, to a massive mall– then back again. Very much unlike the subtle local cycles in a forest, an immense amount of energy is expended."

russs.net/recycling/

Recycling: The Evil Illusion
Over the last five years, I’ve been working on the front lines of the struggle with plastic. I’ve been visiting dump sites and recycling centers around the world to discover for myself what really happens to plastic. In 2015, I took a job at a recycling facility in Canada, to find out what happe...
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5 days ago

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