Economics of Happiness

Helena Norberg-Hodge

Helena is a local film maker and activist best known for her remarkable documentary ‘The Economics of Happiness’.

The Economics of Happiness is a 2011 documentary film directed by Helena Norberg-Hodge, Steven Gorelick, and John Page, and produced by Local Futures (formerly the International Society for Ecology and Culture).SynopsisThe film features many voices from six continents calling for systemic economic change.

The documentary describes a world moving simultaneously in two opposing directions. While government and big business continue to promote globalization and the consolidation of corporate power, people around the world are resisting those policies and working to forge a very different future.

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Communities are coming together to re-build more human scale, ecological economies based on a new paradigm: an economics of localization.Recognition

The Economics of Happiness has won “Best in Show” at the Cinema Verde Film and Arts Festival, “Best Direction” from EKOFilm 2011, “Judges’ Choice” and “Audience Choice” at the Auroville International Film Festival, an “Award of Merit” from the Accolade Film Festival, and several other awards.

In 2012, the film was listed among the top ten films as chosen by Transition town initiatives.In 2015, it was awarded 1st place out of 100 “documentaries we can use to change the world” by Films for Action, an activism-oriented film screening and compilation site.

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Worried about climate change? It's time to talk about #InsaneTrade.

Did you know that countries routinely ship fish caught off their coasts to the other side of the world to be processed, before shipping it back to be sold in domestic markets? Or that countries like the US and UK import thousands of tons of beef, potatoes, eggs, and other foods per year, while exporting identical amounts of the same products?

In an era of runaway climate change and dwindling fossil fuels, this kind of wasteful trade – which overshadows the efforts of well-meaning individuals to reduce their personal carbon footprints – is little short of madness.

We're calling this week #InsaneTradeWeek because we believe it's time corporations took responsibility for these insane acts in the face of a climate emergency.

Please help us raise awareness about #InsaneTrade by sharing our new tongue-in-cheek short film that explains it all.

You can find out more about why global trade is so insane, and how you can demand change, here - bit.ly/2FmjKZe.
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11 hours ago

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Excellent!

An economist friend of mine once told me "trade is always good". I can't agree. Capitalism is prone to these bonkers behaviors. Though I must point out that there are different types of potatoes, for instance, and a lot of produce is seasonal and grown in both hemispheres. At certain times of year, tangerines are in season in Europe and North America while at other times of year, they are in season in Chile and South Africa, so at certain times, the US is exporting its surplus tangerines while at other times it is importing them. That can show up as an insane trade like this.

Brilliant share, Doug, thanks!

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To celebrate #InternationalDayOfForests we're sharing one of our favourite films from our #PlanetLocal short film series.

This inspiring 3-min film explains why diverse forest gardens may be critical to our survival in the years to come.

View this film as part of our week 7 release of #PlanetLocal Short Films - bit.ly/2ETPwwB

bit.ly/2UzCmLVInstead of neat rows of monoculture, forest gardens combine fruit and nut trees, shrubs, herbs, vines and perennial vegetables together in one seemingly wild...
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5 days ago

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Dom Blake - forest garden inspiration.

Wendell Berry speaks to our soul!

Last year, we recorded a conversation between Wendell and Helena Norberg-Hodge, the founder of Local Futures, for our Local Bites Podcast. Their far-reaching discussion touches on human nature, technology, experiential knowledge, agriculture policy, happiness, wildness, and local food systems.

You can listen to the full episode here: bit.ly/2tuK9hW
... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

Wendell Berry speaks to our soul! 

Last year, we recorded a conversation between Wendell and Helena Norberg-Hodge, the founder of Local Futures, for our Local Bites Podcast. Their far-reaching discussion touches on human nature, technology, experiential knowledge, agriculture policy, happiness, wildness, and local food systems.

You can listen to the full episode here: http://bit.ly/2tuK9hW

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My despair is the loss of wild places...

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